Tag Archives: author share

Author Share – Tweeting

Author Share black letters

 

Thanks so much for joining us for today’s installment of “Author Share”. Normandie Alleman, Kathy Batts, and Sheri Savill are here to talk with me about the fabulous (and very confusing to me!) world of Tweeting. Now, I’ll warn you, I have only been tweeting for a few weeks now, and am in way over my head. I like to just retweet what everyone else says, and call it a day. I don’t know the proper lingo (Thirsty Thursday and Fed-up Friday sound good to me!) I’m about to be schooled by these amazing women. Enjoy the ride! 🙂

Katherine Deane: Thanks for joining me ladies. So, let’s jump right in. What is tweeting, and why is it used by authors and readers?

Kathy Batts: Twitter is an online social networking and microblogging service that enables users to send and read short 140-character text messages, called “tweets”. Registered users can read and post tweets, but unregistered users can only read them. Authors use them to get information out to their readers about what’s new, books, events, giveaways, and just to be social and keep in touch.

Katherine Deane: How do I tweet properly without being excessive or annoying?

Kathy Batts: I would do them every half hour/ hour, because if you do it too much, then you become annoying to other people.

Sheri Savill: On being annoying in Twitter, God yes, Twitter can be über-annoying and the jury is out as to whether people even read the all caps ME! ME! ME! tweets anyway, right? I don’t. But I’m a people person. Heh.

Kathy Batts: Put out different content in your Tweets. Don’t use the same ones a million times because then people will unfollow you.

Sheri Savill: I won’t just unfollow you, I will make a voodoo doll of you.

Katherine Deane: What are my choices?

Kathy Batts: You can Tweet manually, or you can use different apps or programs to help automate/schedule them to do a bunch at once if you have a lot of information to get out to people, or if you are busy and don’t have a lot of time. I’m sure there are loads of different options out there, but I have used HooteSuite. There is a regular and paid versions depending on how many Streams you want to attach to you Twitter. The unpaid version you can do five. A Stream counts as a Twitter account, Facebook page, and an Author page on Facebook, etc. And I’ve used that, but I usually use the Hootlet that lives in your browser. Hootlet only works with the Google Chrome browser, so if you use IE, then I would use the HootSuite instead. I like the Hootlet, since if I see anything I want to share, I don’t have to open a program or app, I just click on the owl in my browser.

http://www.hootlet.com/

https://hootsuite.com/products

Katherine Deane: Can you explain buffer app? That is the one I have started using.

Kathy Batts:  https://bufferapp.com/faq#

I haven’t used it really, but I know people that do, and it’s useful to them. Sheri Savill wrote a blog post about it, touting its uses. I love Sheri, she is the best! She knows how to crack me up and be informative at the same time. So you can stop at Sheri’s to learn something new and have a giggle.

http://sherisavill.com/techkink-2/

Sheri Savill: Thanks Kathy, for the kind words! Wow. Means a lot to me. It’s a series I’m kinda doing here and there, calling it TechKink. For authors.

Let me add a plug for my favorite iPhone app, TweetBot. I’ve tried them all, and it’s a personal preference, but TweetBot is by far my fave. You can mute people “forever” rather than unfollow them, for one thing. Not that people are annoying. Heh.

Katherine Deane: What is TT and FF?

Kathy Batts: Translated tweet. #FF stands for “Follow Friday.”

http://mashable.com/2013/07/19/twitter-lingo-guide/

Sheri Savill: There’s also “MT” which is “modified tweet.” Which you can Google.

Katherine Deane: Do I need to reply when people retweet mine or tweet about me?

Kathy Batts: I think it’s only polite to reply when someone tweets about you or tweets yours. The thing with using Triberr is that tons of people are sharing your tweets and it’s hard to thank everyone for that. People are on Triberr to get their information out there to everyone and share yours too.

Katherine Deane: What is Triberr?

Kathy Batts: There is nothing worse than writing a blog post that nobody reads. Triberr solves that problem for bloggers by developing a community of sharing and support with other bloggers.

Triberr is a new and better way to grow your blog’s readership. It’s better because it connects like minded bloggers who are interested in reading and supporting each other. This core community, or Tribe, is the secret to a successful blog.

http://help.triberr.com/faq/

http://help.triberr.com/

Sheri Savill: Triberr drove me insane, though. YMMV.

Katherine Deane: What are the pros and cons for automating your tweets?

Kathy Batts: I think it’s for people that want to schedule it and forget it, so if they are busy, they don’t have to worry about getting information out to people since it’s already there. I would have Jolynn use Buffer so she could do her tweets when she has time, and won’t feel rushed. She’s always working and when she gets home she wants to have her bath, hot tea with honey, and a foot rub.

Sheri Savill: Seriously, endless promo tweets and no live interaction, ever, on Twitter, is annoying and alienating. Just my opinion. Automation is great, and perhaps necessary, these days, but never lose sight of the end-user … real live people, reading your words. Even if it’s just a couple of them (in my case). Moderation, perhaps.

Katherine Deane: Can you please give a few examples of how to tweet properly using a blog post, review, or quote from a book as examples?

Kathy Batts: I attached a jpeg that I did for Jolynn this morning for an example. And also one of Normandie Alleman’s tweet of her Author Spotlight on Jolynn’s blog. I like Normandie’s a lot. You can also embed a tweet into your website or wherever HTML is supported. The code to embed it is below. If you have Blogger or WordPress, go to make a post, and click on text, not visual. Paste it on your post, and click back to visual. Put a title heading for your post and a note in the post, if you want, and click publish.

e.g.

Erotic Romance that’s Rated Arrggh! Check out my Author Spotlight at @JolynnRaymond ‘s Place today. http://t.co/ABxiwIND51 #BDSM

https://support.twitter.com/articles/215585-getting-started-with-twitter#

How to get started:

https://dev.twitter.com/docs/twitter-for-websites

Grab or make your own button for you website and how to embed a tweet:

https://about.twitter.com/resources/buttons#follow

And here’s a jpeg of how to start making your own custom buttons. You have to know how to use HTML to embed it in your website or blog.

Katherine Deane:  Perfect! Thanks so much, Kathy and Sheri! You ladies are awesome for sharing your time and knowledge for this post. 🙂

Normandie Alleman has written up a very informative piece, called “Tweeting 101,” and she is sharing it with us today. Thanks, Normandie!

*****

Thanks Katherine for asking me to talk about tweeting. Twitter is one of my favorite social media outlets. In my previous career I ran a lifestyle blog and used twitter as one of my major marketing tools. I found countless customers and made significant sales through Twitter alone so I can personally attest that you can make money from your Twitter feed. How? By interacting with your followers and building relationships with them.

Will this happen if you automate your tweets and never interact with your Twitter followers? NO. Remember if you aren’t social, you’re not using “social” media to your best advantage.

If all you ever do on Twitter is post a lot of links, and you don’t respond or interact with others all you are doing is standing there shouting at people. If your whole twitter feed is a bunch of people shouting at each other screaming “Look at me! Click MY link!” then who is actually clicking the link? Not a lot of people.

This is why so many people say, “I never get anything out of Twitter.” The truth is that you get out of it what you put into it. I have made friends from all over the world through Twitter, some of them I count as good friends. One helped me through my divorce with our daily twitter conversations. I helped one Twitter friend in South America with funeral arrangements for her father in the United States. I can’t tell you how good that made me feel to help her while she was in a rainforest freaking out about what to do. I once made a sale of over $60,000 basically over Twitter. These events would never have occurred without starting a conversation and getting to know people. On my author account, which is relatively new, I recently met someone whose unique circumstances will make her an invaluable resource as I research a future novel. If you open your mind, the possibilities with Twitter are endless.

As an author I find Twitter more difficult to navigate than I did as a blogger. Blogging, by its very nature is interactive. Being an author really demands that you closet yourself and actually write. We care what our readers think, but if we spend all day chatting about it we’ll never get that book written. I’m not suggesting that you spend all day talking to people on Twitter, but you do need to talk WITH them. Not AT them.

My advice for authors is to try to interact with at least one other person in a personal way on Twitter every time they get on Twitter, or once a day. And I don’t mean another author you’re already friends with. Preaching to the choir is not growing your audience. For that you have to reach out, ask questions, get to know new people. If you respond to someone’s tweet that they’ve been stuck in traffic for over an hour or that they’re having surgery tomorrow – then the NEXT time they see one of your tweets about your latest release they will think of you as a human, a caring person, their Twitter “friend” and not just someone else shouting “Look at me!” and they’re more likely to click on your link.

***

Thanks so much, Normandie! I’m so glad everyone mentioned the human side of tweeting. I am a very social gal, I need feedback and conversation. Knowing that there is more to it than just aimlessly throwing out a ‘less than 100 character’ “Look at Me”, helps a lot. Now that I am fueled with some great knowledge and links, I am looking forward to getting my tweet on!

Thanks for joining us today!

If you have some other Twitter suggestions or want to continue the conversation with more tweet-tastic questions, please reply below. 🙂

Thanks!

*****

Our wonderful co-hostesses for the day:

Normandie Alleman

A former psychologist, Normandie has always been fascinated by human behavior. She loves writing quirky characters that are all too human. “I’m interested in the kind of relationships people have in real life. So I write about my characters’ messy, unpredictable, and inexplicable journeys to love.”

 

If there were another 5 hours in the day, Normandie would spend more time needle-pointing and playing with photography. Instead, she’s a Pinterest addict and sports junkie who’s crazy for Twitter and the color pink. She lives with a passel of children, her hunky husband, and a pet pig who loves Red Bull.

http://normandiealleman.com/

https://www.facebook.com/NormandieAlleman

https://twitter.com/NormandieA

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6893037.Normandie_Alleman

 

Kathy Batts

Kathy aka Jolynn Raymond’s wife, submissive, and TiH spankee. Webmistress, Social Media Manager, and supplier for endless fodder for Jolynn’s stories. You can follow my adventures on her website, or read about them in Taken In Hand and Dark Obsessions.

About Jolynn Raymond:

I’m a strong, bold, and passionate woman who does her best to live out her dreams. I’m having the best years of my life right now, and have discovered my true self in my kinky lifestyle. I’m a wife, Mistress, writer, lesbian, and grandma with a devious imagination and a taste for darkness.

My love of writing began in my early 30s and has been a passion ever since. I love to read, write, travel the world, and am a history buff. My genre’s cover historical romance, often with a spicy kinky twist to suspenseful paranormal thrillers. My love of history makes its presence in the books I write. They are often set in centuries past. I am a lover of art, architecture, and the study of diverse world cultures and have traveled to many places.

I still reside in the city I grew up and live near my childhood home with the love of my life, my two spoiled cats and our gnome, Gerome. I have been involved in the BDSM lifestyle for over ten years, and am active in the kink community. My BDSM and power exchange relationships have always been loving and committed. I am married and we practice kink and BDSM within our marriage.

Jolynn Raymond’s Dark Obsessions features posts relating to all things kink. The articles are based on the author’s own experiences living a kinky lifestyle. Ms. Raymond is a wife, mistress, lesbian, and writer committed to presenting information in a clear and concise way that will instruct and guide both those new to kink and those who are seeking to expand their knowledge. She also offers books of BDSM erotica, kinky historical fiction, and non fiction books on Domestic Discipline, power exchange relationships, and BDSM information.

http://jolynnraymond.com/find-jolynn/

http://jolynnraymond.com/

http://twitter.com/JolynnRaymond

https://www.facebook.com/JolynnRaymond

http://www.amazon.com/Jolynn-Raymond/e/B0090BBN8I/

Sheri Savill

SHERI SAVILL likes to put her name in all caps.

She is an independent author who has written nonfiction and humor for a very long time. Lately she writes BDSM erotica. And w00t, she is a real-life submissive who was into kink long before it was cool. Oh, she’s also an attorney. Because, evil.

A career in publishing/journalism led her to the brink of insanity. Or past the brink, depending on which former employer you ask.

Her hobbies include violating the rules of good writing and grammar simply because she can, directing friends to Google search, telling strangers to lighten the fuck up, and preparing for the zombie apocalypse.

Sheri’s books are said to be slightly less disappointing than Vanilla Coke. Please deposit an additional twenty-five cents for more bio.

​Sheri Savill’swebsite:sherisavill.com

​Sheri onFacebook: ​https://www.facebook.com/sheri.savill

​Sheri’s Author Page onFB  http://smarturl.it/facebookauthorpage

Sheri onTwitter  http://smarturl.it/sherisavilltwitter

​Sheri onGoogle Plus​   http://smarturl.it/sherisavillgoogle

​Sheri onOne Handed Writers: (bi-weekly)http://smarturl.it/onehandedewriters: ​

​Sheri onYouTube: (silly cartoon-videos I made) ​http://www.youtube.com/user/sherisavill

 

 

Author Share – Putting it All Together

Author Share black letters

 

Thanks for joining me today in the first of the “Author Share” series. I have asked Cara Bristol, Patricia Green, and Renee Rose to share with us some of their experiences in the broad topic of “Putting it All Together.” These women are amazing at what they do! And I am blessed to call them each, friends.

 

Katherine Deane: Ladies, thank you so much for joining me today for the first of the “Author Share” Series.

You three are at the top of your game – selling books like wildfire. They’re fantastic, and I adore them!  But there seems to be more to it, than just book writing. I read your wonderfully written blogs, see your promotions, and follow your posts on Facebook. You make it look so dang easy!

Now for a gal like me, just trying to get a handle on all this juggling, I feel overwhelmed just watching you.

So, how do you do… IT?

How do you combine writing, blogging, promoting, and social networking into a workable routine without burning out. (I remember an awesome series by Patricia Green about Burn Out, recently).

 Cara Bristol: When I am actively writing a first draft of a new book, I write a minimum of 1K every day and shoot for 10K per week. Writing comes first, promotion is second. But a big second. Recently, I started reserving Sundays for blog time—writing a week’s worth on that one day, leaving me free to focus on writing during the week. When I have a book release, the week before, during and after, I generally ONLY work on promotion.

Katherine Deane: Do you have a percentage that you use for each activity?

Renee Rose: I wish I could break things down that way, but while I do consider myself a full-time writer, I’m also a mother of two kids who go to two different schools (one hour each trip for pick up and drop off for school) and I see clients during the week for my Feldenkrais practice, teach dance, organize PTA events and generally run around like a chicken with my head cut off.

 

Cara Bristol: When I was a new author, I spent about 90% of my work time writing and 10% on promotion. Now that I’m multi-published, it’s about 50/50, but it varies by where I am in a book project. Of my social media time, the allocation is probably 50 percent blogging, 30% FB, 5% Twitter (used to be more), and 15% all other combined.

 Patricia Green: Not exactly. I read somewhere that an author should spend 80-90% of their time on writing and the other 10-20% on promotions/marketing. I try to use Mondays for promotions (like this interview, blog posts on my blog, blog posts for other people’s blogs, community outreach, etc.) and then use the rest of my week for writing. I do post on FB and Twitter nearly every day, but that takes maybe 10 minutes of my time altogether.

Katherine Deane: What does your weekly schedule look like?

Cara Bristol: I write six days a week, on the seventh I blog. I am on FB and Twitter every day. I catch other social media (Pinterest, Goodreads, Google groups, etc) when I think of it. I’ve found that it works best to focus on two or three things rather than engaging in a smattering on many. But one has to keep one’s ear to the ground because what used to be the “go-to” place can change.

Renee Rose: Basically, I do the email/social media stuff in all the snippets in between. I can retweet from my smart phone while waiting to pick the kids up, or read emails, or laugh at FB posts. I always write in the hour or two after my kids go to sleep, and I hold that time sacred. The rest I fit in if I’m not booked with clients, or if the kids aren’t especially needy, etc.

 Patricia Green: My schedule is weekly, but I keep a “blogging calendar” to keep track of the various obligations I have.

Katherine Deane: What is the most important of them all? (Please don’t say “all of them”. LOL, I’m overwhelmed as it is!)

Patricia Green: By far and away, the most important task I have to do is write. If I don’t do that, I’m out of business. If I have a writing deadline, if takes precedence.

Cara Bristol: This varies by author because it all depends on how much you invest in the activity. For me, it’s blogging. I post about four times a week. With blogging, I can control the message, and I’m not limited by space requirements. And I enjoy blogging so I’m motivated to do it.

Renee Rose: I don’t know. Blog posting, I suppose, but I get more sucked in to the Facebooking.

Katherine Deane: If you had one tip for new and aspiring authors, what would it be?

Cara Bristol: Get socially connected so that people know your name before you publish. Get your blog established, build a cadre of FB friends and Twitter followers, get to know other authors in your genre.

Patricia Green: Write more books!

Renee Rose: Join the Spanking Fiction Facebook group! Once you’re in there, you have a whole community to gain from.

Katherine Deane: And for my own sake, do you have a house cleaner? Seriously, there seems to be a direct correlation between the messy kitchen and piles of laundry and my good writing days.

Patricia Green: Yes. I have a housekeeping service. The only thing they don’t do is laundry and window washing. I have a window washing service for that twice a year. It’s an expense I’m willing to shoulder because I like a clean house, my back is wonky, and I’d rather spend my time working. My husband doesn’t do housekeeping. We divided the chores up early, and the housekeeping fell to me. It’s his job to make big bucks. 🙂

Renee Rose: I agree, my good writing days correspond with messy house, too! 😦

 Cara Bristol: I do have a housekeeper. I rewarded myself with one when my royalties reached an arbitrary goal I’d set. But my housekeeper only comes twice a month—so the daily stuff (dishes, laundry, sweeping) still remains. But I have learned to turn a blind eye to the house until I have completed my daily writing, and I have stopped picking up after DH all together (he does his own laundry and he is responsible for cleaning his office/the library and his side of the master bathroom).

Katherine Deane: LOL, I’m glad to see we all have something in common! My next big goal is to sell enough books to afford some weekly cleaning help. 🙂

***

As we can see, each author does things differently. They have found what works for them. Writing, blogging, promoting, social networking – it’s all important. But the gist of it, is to combine these activities into a cohesive structure that works for each of us.

My plan is to figure out how to do each of these different activities through specific blog posts utilizing the experiences of other SMEs (Subject Matter Experts). Stay tuned as I delve deep into this thing called authorship.

And please don’t forget to reply. I’d love to hear your experiences and suggestions! And if you have any further questions for the authors, about this week’s topic (Putting it All Together), please reply below.

Next week’s “Author Share” post will be about blogging. I can’t wait to share our discussion!

Thanks again to Cara Bristol, Patricia Green, and Renee Rose for getting this series started.

Happy Spankings Writing!

🙂

 

About the authors:

Cara Bristol

Cara Bristol has written everything from mainstream long and short fiction to nonfiction magazine and newspaper articles. She sold her first erotic romance in 2009. She is best known for her spanking romances, but she has also written in the science fiction romance, contemporary, and paranormal genres. Multi-published, she has released more than a dozen erotic romances, including two series: the Rod and Cane Society (spanking romance) and Breeder (science fiction romance). Cara lives in the Midwest United States with her husband. When she’s not writing, she enjoys reading, traveling, and watching reality TV shows.

Author website

Twitter @CaraBristol

Facebook

Email: carabristol50@yahoo.com

***

Patricia Green

Patricia Green is a full-time fiction writer specializing in erotic romance. She provides the reader with love stories that emphasize fun characters with quirky personalities. Patricia is the author of more than 20 published novels and novellas.

In her personal life, Patricia is married and the mother of twins. When she’s not being the angel of domestic harmony and a semi-crazed creator of fictional friends, she loves to read, crochet, knit and watch hockey and baseball.

You can reach Patricia Green in the following ways:

Email: pig (at) patriciagreenbooks (dot) com

Website/Blog: http://www.patriciagreenbooks.com

Spanking romance pages: http://patriciagreenbooks.com/books-featuring-spanking/

Facebook http://www.facebook.com/Patricia.Green.Romance

Twitter: @PatriciaIGreen

Amazon Author Page:  http://www.amazon.com/Patricia-Green/e/B002RCB0IK/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

***

Renee Rose

Renee Rose is a multi-published author of erotic spanking romance.  Her latest release The Bossman, won Eroticon USA’s Next Top Erotic Author contest. Her blog can be found at www.reneeroseromance.com. She can also be found on Twitter or Facebook.